OSF GuidesRecent Updates

Recent Updates

  • Updated on: May 04, 2018

    View Project Files and Images

    Manual Project Files
  • Updated on: May 04, 2018

    Upload files

    Each project and component can have its own set of files, allowing you to organize your files into meaningful groups like datasets or background research.

    Each file is also given a unique, persistent URL, meaning that it can be cited or linked to individually.

    Manual Project Files
  • Updated on: May 04, 2018

    View Versions of the Wiki

    Manual Collaborating
  • Updated on: May 04, 2018

    Rename Wiki Pages

    Manual Collaborating
  • Updated on: May 04, 2018

    Add and Delete Wiki Pages

    Manual Collaborating
  • Updated on: May 04, 2018

    Edit the Wiki

    The wiki is a versatile tool for interacting with your team and others who view your work. Wikis can be used to explain the main points of your project and can contain information like lab notes, contact information, or more in-depth details about your project.

    The wiki supports collaborative editing, meaning your entire team can work on it at the same time. You can also make wikis publicly editable to allow visitors to your project to contribute. All versions of a wiki page are saved, so you can always go back to previous versions and compare current wikis with previous iterations.

    Manual Collaborating
  • Updated on: May 04, 2018

    Comment on a Project

    Users can leave comments on OSF projects or individual files within OSF projects. Commenting can be configured so that only project contributors can comment or any OSF user can comment.

    Manual Collaborating
  • Updated on: May 04, 2018

    Create a View-only Link for a Project

    You can share the contents of private projects with non-contributors by creating View-Only Links. These links can also be anonymized to remove identifying information, useful in blinded peer review.

  • Updated on: May 04, 2018

    Add a Redirect Link

  • Updated on: May 04, 2018

    Link to a Project

    In this article, you will learn about how links and forks can help make connections between multiple OSF projects.

    Linking a project creates an easy path for those viewing your work to find another related project.

    Forking a project creates a copy of an existing project and all of its contents. The fork always points back to the original project, forming a network of functional citations. You might use a fork to copy another's work to build on and extend. For example, a professor may create an OSF project of materials for individual student use. Each student forks the project to have his or her own copy of the materials to start his/her own work.